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Friday, June 30, 2017

Treatment Transparency is needed to understand Medical Treatments

Free speech includes the the freedom to to talk about products before we buy them. In economic terms, we need price transparency and product transparency.

Sadly there is very little "useful" free speech about medical treatments. Right now it's like going into a grocery store and seeing cans without labels. We pretty much have no idea what's in the can! Close your eyes and imagine walking into a grocery store and seeing row after row of cans without labels. That's the situation in healthcare today. There are no labels are on anything...at least not any understandable labels.

We need to start putting labels (product transparency) on medical treatments!


Why don't we already have labels on our cans? Why don't we already have product transparency for medical treatments? Why don't we know whether that chemotherapy is 90% effective for patients like us or 1% effective for patients like us? Why don't we know if that treatment for insomnia is 99% effective or 30% effective?

The problem is that those who consume medical treatments (patients) don't understand medical statistics. In addition, studies show that those who provide medical treatments (physicians) mostly don't understand treatment effects either. We have the blind leading the blind!

Thus, when it comes to medical treatments there is very little treatment transparency. It's UNACCEPTABLE! We must fix treatment transparency for patients, doctors, and nurses.

We need to help patients!

Patients are suffering from health illiteracy, medical scams, under-treatment, over-treatment, mistreatment, and being lied to with statistics. It’s horrible.

How to explain Treatment Scores? Well, every year we figure out our “gross income” and “net income” when we do our income taxes. So, we simply figure out the “gross treatment benefit” and the “net treatment benefit” for patients as digested from the medical literature.

CONTACT
If you are interested in Treatment Scores, please email:
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ABOUT
Treatment Scores was started by an anesthesiologist, an emergency physician, a physician programmer, and Dr. Hennenfent. Brad Hennenfent graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in economics, graduated medical school from the University of Illinois, and did his Emergency Medicine residency at the UIC Affiliated Hospitals Emergency Medicine Residency Program. After two years as a practicing emergency physician, he became director of an inner-city emergency department in Chicago. Then, he went into business and became the director of over 10 emergency departments and urgent care centers. Dr. Hennenfent has had five uncles with prostate cancer. He became an advocate, and, while working with a medical non-profit, helped get over $20 million dollars of federal funding released for medical research to the National Institutes of Health. He also helped get over $100,000 worth of grants in kind or donations year after year. In his retirement in Florida, he has become very interested in medical statistics and treatment transparency for patients. He believes patients should be more informed and more powerful. Dr. Hennenfent likes to combine the mathematics of economics with the mathematics of medicine.

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DISCLAIMER
You must always see a licensed physician for diagnosis and treatment. Treatment Scores are only an educational exercise. Death or disability can result if you don't see your own medical physician, call an ambulance, or go to the emergency department immediately for your medical issues.

Copyright © 2017 Bradley R. Hennenfent, M.D. All rights reserved.

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